Paris Agreement analysis

http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2016/apr/22/un-climate-change-signing-ceremony

The Paris Agreement appears to be a step in the right direction with regards to global progress toward a healthier planet. Previous agreements which capped global warming to 2 degrees centigrade have not as of yet matched with legal policy and action taken by the respective nations. It is because global warming creates a crowd effect wherein no individual nation can really make a difference, that it is important that these consensuses impose the idea that if we all act then we can make a change. Global warming effects the planet in many ways, and the warming is not evenly distributed. The poles are disproportionately heated, leading to less glacial mass, leading to less white surface which as a result absorbs more heat. It effects the impoverished nations more imminently, with temperatures in Chad having hit an unbearable 48 degrees Celsius.
The United States is the only major power where a significant political party holds the stance that global warming is a fiction. The article even mentioned that this agreement was made in part due to the urgency in "Donald Trump’s ascendancy in the Republican presidential primaries – [thus it is important to] impose a four-year delay on any future leaders seeking to exit the agreement". The science behind global warming is well known; when you introduce any substance into the atmosphere it will alter it in some way. This effect is negligible on a small scale, however decades of constant growth in carbon emissions has led to a significant increase in the percentage of carbon that makes up the atmosphere.

Does it seem likely that this newest tie between nations toward reducing emissions will actually lead to progress?
As the second largest source of global pollution what would be the effect on progress if the United States adopted more policy in regards to Global Warming being a hoax?

Eugene Dorokhin

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2 Responses to Paris Agreement analysis

  1. Lucy Sandoval says:

    I feel like they keep talking about it and signing what “the will do” but they don’t do “what they say” This ideology needs to change. And we also have to stop talking and start doing. Politicians need to move quicker and big corporations need to have restrictions and reduce or stop emission use overall. They keep taking small steps but are passing by on major opportunities to stabilize the ecosystem and ban its destruction caused by us itself.

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  2. cwassif says:

    I think that you raise a number of interesting points and considerations. First of all, I do not think that this newest tie will actually lead to real progress fast enough to avoid projections of disaster. There are many reasons for this thought process, for one thing , the fact that this is the newest in a line of initiatives is indicative of the ineffectiveness of these conferences. We’ve had the Kyoto Protocol, Copenhagen, etc., this almost seems like a formality at this point. Also, even if the initiatives proposed in Paris are followed 100%, we will still be on track towards devastation, action should have been taken decades ago. Furthermore, given the political/ economic structures of most of the nations involved, and the power dynamics of globalization, most of these countries don’t have the power to implement the industrial changes necessary to reach their goal.

    The fact that the United States is the second greatest polluter, yet still denies climate change is another challenge to implementing these proposals. It is also important to remember that the greatest polluter, China, has such high emissions largely because they are producing our goods, so arguably we are singlehandedly driving these emissions up, and singlehandedly control the ways to move forward. So the fact that active climate denial is embraced by a sizeable portion of our population, and even our elected officials, makes me skeptical that this conference really means anything.

    -Christopher Wassif

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